Down The Garden Path

Sorry I haven’t been posting as much as I usually do–I took a spill down some cement stairs and did a number on my foot, so I’ve been out of commission for a while.  However, I got out to the garden today, and snapped a few photos for your enjoyment.  Come with me, if you will, down the garden path . . .

The roses have made a grand appearance (just in time for Portland’s Rose Festival):

‘Phylis Bide’ repeat-blooming rambling rose dresses up the entrance to our home.

“I’m ready for my closeup, Mr. DeMille . . .”

Graham joins the party . . .

‘Graham Thomas’, a David Austin rose, on a blue arbor.  And in for the closeup . . .

As you can see, I have a thing for cabbage roses.

And now . . .

The thornless climber, ‘Zephrin Drouhin’.

I love that this rose does not scratch my arms to smithereens when I prune it.

This is a lovely single-blooming climbing rose that my mom gave to me.  I have no idea of its name or origins, but I can tell you that it is a very tough customer–it survives my parent’s zone 4b climate and thrives there.

And now hail to the chief . . .

‘Mr. Lincoln’, to be precise. 

Farther down the garden path . . .

A vibrant, summer blue delphinium with allium heads about to bloom nearby.

Persian Jewels in a pathway consisting of gravel and bear-paw metal stepping stones left by previous owners.

Three sisters, probably a singing trio like the Garland Sisters, the Boswell Sisters, or the Andrews Sisters, holding court in the golden creeping  jenny.

‘Romantika’ clematis gets in the mood with Golden Hops.

Getting tired?  We can sit for a bit . . .

Just the place to be for flower and bird watching.

Is it time already?  As the lyricist said, ” Ah well, we’ll catch up some other time.”

The garden fairy says goodbye.

 


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Clematis ‘Princess Diana’ Starting To Bloom

I have a clematis ‘Princess Diana’ that is just starting to bloom in amongst the Roses ‘Zephrin Drouhin’ (flowers about the same color as the clematis) and ‘Golden Showers’ (yellow flowers).  It has very healthy foliage low on the plant, and it also blooms rather low on the plant at about four to five feet, and these qualities make it a good companion for the bare bottom stems so common on climbing roses.  The flowers on Diana are approximately one and a half inches long and bell-shaped.  They are a rose color, with white to soft pink around the edges of the sepals.  A very pretty clematis that does well here in gardening zone 8 in Southwest Washington state.  This is a member of the C. texensis grouping of clematis, meaning that they all tend to have flowers in the red color, and Diana likes a sunny spot with ample water and good drainage–put a good shovelful of gravel into the planting hole to help with this.  It blooms on new growth, which means that you will want to prune this clematis back to eighteen inches tall or so when it is dormant, usually in February or March in this area.  Fertilize it once a month starting in April and continue through the growing season.

And more of a close-up of the flowers:

Please feel free to leave a comment–have you grown clematis ‘Princess Diana’ in your garden, and with what other plants do you combine it?

Roses Supreme

The roses are in full bloom right now.  I have a particularly nice combination on the front stoop of the house.  There are columns that are completely covered with a wonderful Old Garden rambling rose named ‘Phylis Bide.’  This rose is a shrimp-color at first, and then fades to more of a pink.  Growing with it are two clematis in containers, one being ‘Daniel Deronda,’ a dark purple beauty, and ‘Louise Rowe,’ a lavender clematis that produces double and single blooms at the same time.  Lavender and peach colors look very good together.  Along with these, I have an abutilon, or a flowering maple, with chartreuse leaves and orange blooms.  It all is looking quite fetching together at the moment.